African Parliamentary Alliance for UN Reforms
 
The Campaign

The Campaign

Welcome to the “Afrexit Campaign”

Afrexit is an abbreviation for “African exit.” It refers to an African Parliamentary appeal for the African Union to engage in a campaign of organised non-cooperation with the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), and eventually exit from the body in 2023 if the world’s highest security institution fails to reform.

Calls for Afrexit emerged at the Plenary of the Pan African Parliament (PAP) on 12th October 2016 in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt - at the occasion of the 150th Anniversary of the Egyptian Parliament. 

Following APAUNR’s Chairman Hon Onyango Kakoba’s clarion call for PAP (Africa’s Parliament) to give an unmatched Parliamentary impetus to the work of the Committee of Ten Heads of State (C-10) established by the African Union (AU) to champion the African Common Position on UNSC reform, there was overwhelming ‘Call to Action’ from elected representatives from all 54 AU states, whose blazing light of truth appealed to the Parliaments of Africa to wholeheartedly support the C-10’s quest to ensure the continent takes its rightful position on global matters.


APAUNR’s Chairman Hon Onyango Kakoba addressing the Plenary of the Pan African Parliament (PAP) in Sharm el Sheikh, Egypt

Whereas Member States of the United Nations have pledged themselves to uphold the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, and as the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world, 

Taking cognizance of the fact that the transatlantic slave trade created the conditions for the subsequent colonial conquest of Africa, the justification of the ideology of racism and the unequal relationship that still exists between Africa and the world's big powers,

Mindful of the fact that at the time when much of the world was under colonial rule, the winners of the World War II, collectively known as the Permanent Five (P-5) crafted the Charter of the United Nations (UN) in their national interests, divided the Permanent Seats and associated Veto Power amongst them, whilst ensuring their decisions bind on all UN member states indefinitely,

Bearing in Mind that the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) remains a legalised caste system, and the most significant legacy of colonialism, with Africa without a Permanent representation, despite having the largest UN membership,

Taking into account the fact that African leaders meeting in Swaziland in 2005 made no mistake in adopting the Ezulwini Consensus as the antidote for the historical injustice meted out to the African continent, created the Committee of Ten Heads of State (C-10) with mandate to advocate and canvass the Common African position on Security Council reforms - for Africa to be represented and to participate meaningfully in a world order capable of maintaining global peace and security,

Acknowledging the truism that despite more than ten years of intense efforts by the C-10 to reform UNSC, P-5 members continue to embark on delay tactics, cover up for each other, address only their strategic interest - political motives, and are determine to maintain the status quo, 

Cognizant of the fact that UNSC reflects a world that no longer exists, has defaulted from its promissory promise, suffers from gridlock, political sclerosis and lacks a proactive strategy for conflict prevention, 

Recognising that since its establishment in 2002, African citizens have been the only targets of the International Criminal Court’s jurisdiction, and a proxy instrument for powerful non-member states; who see no need to subject themselves to its discipline, to persecute African leaders and effect regime change on the continent, 

Convinced that by blocking motions, preventing multilateralism that is based on democratically-evolved global consensus, and denying the sad reality of today’s spiralling global crisis, the actions of P-5 Members have resulted in barbarous acts which have outraged the conscience of mankind,

Lauding the efforts undertaken thus far by the C-10, their faith in UNSC reforms as a fundamental human rights, the highest aspiration of the common people and the foundation of larger freedom, justice and peace in the world,

Afrexit has been initiated as a momentous opportunity for 1.2 Billion Africans whose voices have not been heard to dramatize their legitimate discontentment of a shameful condition.

As part of the campaign, elected representatives of the peoples of Africa in the 54 National Assemblies across the continent, will sign Petitions and adopt Resolutions, explicitly calling on the AU to engage in a campaign of organised non-cooperation and an eventual exit from the UNSC in 2023 if the body fails to agree on the Ezulwini Consensus (AU’s antidote for the historical injustice meted out to the continent).

The petition will be handed over to key AU organs and other international organisations for consideration.

According to a 2010 Council on Foreign Relations report “…the 1965 amendment demonstrates that a well-organized bloc of developing countries can press UNSC reform over the reservations of permanent members. Today the African Union is well positioned to play the role of kingmaker, should it throw its numerical weight behind a reform framework.” 

With 54 member states represented in one grouping, making up 42% of the 129 votes needed to pass a General Assembly resolution expanding the UNSC, Africa is the heavyweight in Security Council reform discussions. 

Africa has managed to do little with that power thus far, but Afrexit is the spark that will ignite the beginning of the end for historical injustice that has eschewed the balance of UNSC. 

This is our chance to lend our voices to those that have done so before us. When voices join together they get heard. Afrexit is the embodiment of that spirit. 

Together lets push the powerful in power to involve the powerless in making the world a better place.

Together, let us write a different story, let us change the world. 

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